Series Calendar

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Land-scaping

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Tuesday, February 28 5p
Wednesday, March 1, 2017
When: 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Harman Academy, DML 241

In a world that with sharp divisions, landscape architecture is a powerful tool to marry social and ecological justice.  It has the capacity to address the most pressing and fundamental problems facing the world today, amongst which are climate change, water and food security and deforestation.  Landscape architecture must set the boundaries for policy makers and orient social movements. Bold and inspired projects can lead policy and point the way for future developments. The political agency of the profession must be forcibly reactivated and the power of landscape architecture engaged to be a game changer in reshaping ecological systems and transforming forms of responsible living. Join Professor Kelly Shannon in a vibrant inquiry on the polymathic potential of land-scaping.

Shannon Kelly, Professor of Architecture and Spatial Sciences

Kelly Shannon is Professor of Architecture and Spatial Sciences and Director of the Graduate Program of Landscape Architecture + Urbanism, School of Architecture.  Kelly has held teaching positions in Europe, Asia and in the United States and has lectured throughout the world. Her design research is at the intersection of interpretative mapping, projective cartography, urbanism and landscape. Her teaching, research and practice engages numerous contexts (Belgium, Estonia, Vietnam, China, Indonesia, Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka, Kenya, Morocco, etc.), primarily in the public sector, focused on the development of robust landscape structures as a form of resilience to deal with contemporary design challenges at the territorial and urban design scales. Kelly is also co-founder of Research Urbanism and Architecture (RUA) whose projects include the master plan revision for Cantho, Vietnam approved by the Prime Minister. She co-edits the book series UFO: Explorations of Urbanism, is co-editor of the Journal of Landscape Architecture, and co-authored The Landscape of Contemporary Infrastructure.

2017-03-01
17:00 to 18:30
 
 
 
 
 
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Quadrants 1 and 2

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Monday, March 6, 5p
Tuesday, March 7, 2017
When: 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Location: 
Harman Academy, DML 241

The Academy for Polymathic Study guides its enquiries through four flexible pathways or Quadrants:  (1) critical and integrative thinking; (2) study of the polymaths; (3) the tapestry of knowledge; and (4) communication.  In order to explicate these Quadrants more fully, Edwin McCann, professor of philosophy and English, will conduct four conversational workshops over the fall and spring terms from a philosophical, historical, and practical point of view.  Attendance at these two sessions covering all four quadrants is required for Academy certification.

Quadrants (1) critical and integrative thinking, and (2) study of the polymaths will be discussed. 

Edwin McCann

Edwin McCann, Professor of Philosophy and English

A philosopher, literary scholar, and historian, Professor Ed McCann’s research interests center in the history of modern philosophy, especially Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Newton, Kant, and the great early 20th century polymath Ludwig Wittgenstein.  One example of his innovative approach to philosophical and historical inquiry, Professor McCann guides his students to view trials as crucial indicators of society coming to terms with threatening concepts and their implications.  Professor McCann is a treasure-trove of knowledge who patiently walks students through not only the complex historical conditions, but also the intellectual climate of each era. 

2017-03-07
17:00 to 19:00
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Sustaining

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Tuesday, March 28 5p
Wednesday, March 29, 2017
When: 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Location: 
Harman Academy, DML 241
ADD TO MY CALENDAR

These days when we hear the term sustaining, we typically think of the environment and the science of climate change. Rates of carbon emissions; renewable energy; food scarcity; pollution, etc. are the variables that come to mind.  But how people from diverse populations and from different countries come together to sustain the environment and their social worlds is the cultural-sociological approach missing in the sustainability equation above.  Professor of Sociology Pierrette Hongadneu-Sotelo has been studying, thinking, and writing about the relationship between migration and food systems for the past several years. “How we all engage with soil, plants, and water,” writes Hongadneu-Sotelo, “will determine the ecological viability of the planet.” And urban gardens, she has found, are the laboratories where the sustaining of nature and community intersect.  Professor Hongadneu-Sotelo will discuss her creative thinking processes in her research, which offer us another model of a polymathic practice that illuminates the interconnectedness of global concerns of such magnitude as climate change and migration.

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo, Professor of Sociology

Pierrette Hondagneu-Sotelo is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Southern California. Her research examines how Latino immigrants negotiate challenges with informal sector work, varied legal status, and changing gender, family and community relations.  She has authored or edited nine books, and held research and writing fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation for the Humanities, the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, UCSD’s Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, and the Getty Research Institute.  At USC, she enjoys helping undergraduate and graduate students construct their own research projects, and her teaching and mentorship have been recognized with the 2006 Mellon Excellence in Mentoring Award, the 2000 General Education Teaching Award, and most recently with the 2015 Feminist Mentor Award from the Sociologists for Women in Society, in recognition of her mentorship of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows.  In 2015, she received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association, International Migration Section.  

2017-03-29
17:00 to 18:30