Polymathic Pizza - The Renaissance Revisited

Fall 2011
Polymathic Pizza - The Renaissance Revisited

A series of informal yet directed undergraduate encounters with faculty who have demonstrated polymathic approaches to scholarship and teaching, with discussions focused upon the meaning and continuing challenge of the Renaissance.

Held on Wednesday throughout Fall 2011 from 5:00pm – 6:30pm, in DML 241, unless otherwise noted.

William Greg Thalmann
September 7, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

The Divine Comedy by the late medieval Italian poet Dante Alighieri at once summarized the Middle Ages and suggested the impending era of Renaissance humanism.  As a philosopher and theologian, Dante mastered the thought of his time.  As a polymath with interests in Roman history, Latin...

Sheryl Reiss
September 14, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

The classical adage “civilization follows commerce” took on new intensity in the Renaissance as mercantile and banking dynasties such as the De Medicis of Italy and the Fuggers of Germany established European-wide networks of commerce and became patrons of the arts and sciences.  During this era...

Alexander Marr
October 5, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

Renaissance painting was vitalized by learning, social purpose, politics, history, and—above all else—art for its own sake.  How and why did the artists of the Renaissance manage to fuse so many perspectives into one art form?  And how does any art historian go about the task of deciphering...

Peter Mancall
October 12, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

Medicine is by definition a polymathic pursuit.  Renaissance physicians not only revived Galen, they went beyond this classical source to re-establish medicine as an experimental science and art form—and, in so doing, they restored medicine to its ancient and rightful place as nursery of arts...

James Heft
October 26, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

The Renaissance represents a paradox. On the one hand, it gloried in man and the world. On the other hand, it was the age of Reformation and Counter-Reformation across Europe and European outposts in Asia and the New World. Religion acquired learning, and learning acquired religion in these...

Tara McPherson
November 9, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

The Revival of Learning depended upon—and stimulated—the assembly of great libraries, the restoration of ancient texts, and the codification of knowledge.  Thus librarians and library founders made of librarianship a polymathic science.

Diane Ghirardo
November 30, 2011
5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Doheny Memorial Library,
Room 241

Reaching back to Vitruvius, Renaissance architects revived classical architecture, while animating it with disciplined, present-tense passion.  In a few crowded decades, classicism was revived from a thousand year quietus—and transformed into a prototype for the next 500 years of architectural...